Putting on Noise Cancelling Headphones

This is a small rant. It’s needed. I have debated about writing this post for some time now.

A few years ago I was living in a very small town (small and uber religious), running a grocery store. I was stressed. The previous manager had been “invited to leave”, and I had jumped from supervisor to store manager (leaping right over the assistant manager in the process). The staff were under stress. Morale sucked, it was Thanksgiving and my assistant decided to go on Medical leave (did I mention the very small, uber religious town I was living in?).

During that time my boss would call me and tell me to stop listening to all the noise. At the time, I was angry, frustrated, tired, stressed and so many other things. I decided he was being an ass (which he was on a regular basis). It was hell. A hell that I lived through for almost a year before I finally gave up and packed it in.

It wasn’t until I left that I realised that he was right (Oh man, I hate admitting that).  I was listening to the noise. I was paying attention to what everyone around me was thinking and saying instead of focusing on myself and doing what I know I can do. When I listened to the noise, I became lost and unfocused. I made mistakes. I was unhealthy and unhappy. My job became my life and my life became my job.

Fast-forward about 3 years and I’m further away from the noise I experienced in that small uber religious town. I’m living part of my dream. I’m travelling more and I’ve created this blog as an outlet.

In the beginning, it was fun, a lot of fun. I loved logging into the internet and sharing my stories and thoughts with all of you. I became mildly addicted to Twitter and started to interact with a huge group of people who were travel bloggers, like myself. At the time, it was perfection.

In the last year, my version of perfection has been slipping away. Slowly, but steadily. The noise started to creep back into my life. It started when I made the choice to fly back to Canada early to take care of some family stuff. The reaction I received was “You’re trip is over? You’re not travelling?”.  That’s when the noise bought a reclining chair, set-up a big screen t.v., bought a keg of beer, ordered 10 large pizzas and made my mind its home.

I started to pay attention to all these people who were giving suggestions on what to write about on a travel blog, and what not to write about (I believe this post was in the not section). Numbers, omg everyone seemed to be talking numbers, analytics, rankings, SEO and more. My mind went from a crystal clear zen-like state to a muddy one. Panic started to set in, and things became muddy.

I started to worry that I wasn’t enough anymore. I was in Canada. I left Asia. OMG, my readers are going to bail as if this blog is the Titanic. They don’t want to read my stuff anymore. It’s going to be boring as hell.

So, I decided to bite off way more than I could chew at the time and thought of adding contributing authors. The ladies who volunteered their time, skills and thoughts were amazing. I feel so blessed to have had them working with me. However, as time progressed I became more and more distant.  My blog didn’t feel like the space I had created in October 2009.  The noise around me had a full grasp on me. I was trying to do and be what everyone else thought I should, and I stopped being, well, me. I even disappeared from Twitter and Facebook from time to time.

In February I went on this awesome road trip for a month. I visited 4 states, met up with friends and hung out with family. I was looking forward to sharing my trip with everyone, but when I got home, the funk set in, fast. I didn’t have the energy to do it. I felt low. I didn’t think I could write about my trip in a way that my readers would enjoy. I tried and in my eyes, I failed. In March I was still feeling the same way.

Last month things started to change. I would wake up in the morning and think of my return to Thailand in October. I felt excited, for the first time in a real long time. The noise seemed to be less intense and I became more aware of myself and my surroundings.

I looked in the mirror and decided to put on some noise cancelling headphones and take the control back. I deleted the Alexa widget on the blog, as well as the Feedburner widget. I stopped looking at analytics and I wrote my lovely ladies to thank them for their contribution and to let them know that I had decided to stop the program for now, and I removed the newsletter sign-up button.

I decided that I need to go back to when blogging was fun. I need to focus on me, my experiences and what I love about writing. I need to stop trying to be something (or someone) I’m not. Sure, my numbers will suffer, but to me, finding my crystal clear zen-like mind is more important. I’m dialing back to find the joy and when I find it, I won’t rush to be more than I am able to handle.

One of the reasons why I love to travel is because it’s all about me. It’s about my experiences. I have an amazing time because I make myself available to it. Basically, when I travel, the noise isn’t there. There is nothing distracting me. It’s just me. As selfish as that may sound, it’s a good thing. Hopefully, over time, you will agree with me.

 


About The Author

I'm a travel writer and photographer who specializes in bespoke travel experiences. I write about boutique, savvy and cultural travel. My writing has been featured in Outpost Magazine, Travel + Escape, and UP! Magazine.

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64 Responses

  1. Anonymous

    Great post! I think everyone needs some noise cancelling headphones in their arsenal.

    When I got back to Australia in early Dec everyone was talking numbers too and I just ran and hid because I thought I was the only person out there too newbie to understand all these crazy things and hoped no one would ask /me/ what numbers I were getting!

    Hope you begin enjoying your blog some more and (when the time comes) enjoy Thailand! Can’t wait to read about it! 🙂

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thank-you, Nicole.
      The numbers game can be really frustrating, especially for those of us who haven’t had the time (or money) to buy an $80 eBook to tell us why they are important and how to increase them.
      I can’t wait to share more about Thailand and the project I have running there.

      Reply
  2. Michelle Snow

     I can relate. Sometimes you get so caught up in the noise about numbers and content and all that that you forget that you started blogging as a fun outlet. I’m in the process of reclaiming my personal blog just for that reason. I pulled out all the travel stuff and put it up on a totally different blog. My personal blog in now going to be, well, personal.

    I started reading your blog because I enjoy reading about experiences, whether it’s Thailand or just traipsing around your home turf. So just bring yourself to this blog. Let the readers decide if they want to tag along or not. =)

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thanks for your support Michelle!

      For a little while, I was thinking of skipping TBEX as I didn’t want to encounter even more noise. I’m still thinking about it actually. 🙂

      Reply
      • Michelle Snow

        I was going to go, but I just sold my ticket. I can’t go for health reasons but I understand not going due to the noise.  I’m thinking about doing Prague in Nov though. So if you miss this one, there’s always that one. =)

  3. Charu

    I can totally relate to this post and kudos to you Pam for putting the noise-cancelling headphones on. It’s definitely needed in this crazy world. I think we all need to remember no one is judging us, we are all trying to find outselves so we can become stronger individuals first and then help others.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thanks, Charu! I find it hard to remember the non-judging thing, especially after attending TBEX last year. I had so many awkward encounters. I am working on caring about what’s important to me first and hopefully my readers can relate. 🙂

      Reply
  4. SpunkyGirl Monologues

    Lindsay, thank-you so much for your comment.

    You’re totally right about our own noise and self-doubts. I think our own noise can often be more distracting in the long run. I still battle my own noise -on a daily basis. Hard as it may be, I need to look for the positive and make the most of my life.

    I know you’ll find the joy of less noise. It’s super hard to take the plunge and quit that part of your life, but believe me when I say, it will feel good. It may not feel good right away, but it will feel good in time. 🙂

    Reply
  5. Unbravegirl

    I know how it feels when all the popularity talk and “you should do this with your blog” suggestions get to you. Everybody blogs for their own purpose — some people want to be the most popular blogger out there, others just want a platform to write and others want to connect with people (no matter how big or small that group of people is). You’ve got your purpose & you’re doing your own thing. Good for you!

    Reply
  6. Katie

    Awesome, awesome post!  I can relate on so many levels.  I have been in many jobs situations like you first describe, including my current one. It’s easy to get caught up in the negativity, drama and stress of everyone around me, but I have been focusing big time on trying to “keep out the noise” (although I never thought about it like that, I like the analogy). 

    At the same time, I started my blog almost a year ago and struggled to find my voice and figure out what to do with it, trying to come up with posts that I thought I should be writing (especially difficult because I haven’t been traveling!) and found myself completely uninspired.  Eventually I realized I just needed to write what I wanted to write and not worry about whether everyone will like it – because it’s impossible to appeal to everyone.

    I’m glad you’ve had this epiphany and I hope you’ll continue to keep out the noise going forward!  Some of my favorite blogs to read are the ones with personality, that don’t abide by the “rules” or do things the way other bloggers might expect them to be done. 

    Was bummed to hear you wouldn’t be at TBEX, although now I’m kinda thinking this may have something to do with that?

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      A wee bit. My TBEX decision was a combination of money, my current job and noise. I would love to go and talk with people, participate in the workshops etc., but I don’t think I’m ready for that right now. I want to focus on myself and connecting with my readers again. The stuff that’s covered at TBEX can wait for another time.

      Hopefully we can meet some day!!

      Reply
  7. spencerspellman

    *Stands and applauds* Bravo, bravo, bravo. Anybody that’s in any industry should read this, but I think especially travel. After 3 months in Central America, one of the first things I did was go to a travel event and then subsequent meetup of travel peeps. Someone asked: “Who were the rockstars of travel blogging.”. I basically responded by saying that’s not the question you should be asking, but rather my exact words were: “Do and write whatever the fuck you want.” My motto of the last year has been that I’m going to do what I want.

    Travel and writing is meant to be fun and meant to be an expression of self and not a product of imitation. I think when it becomes a product of imitation, than it loses a sense of simplicity and authenticity. It becomes watered down. Way to be a voice on this subject. It’s a breath of fresh air.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thank-you for the comment, Spencer!

      It’s hard to say “Screw them, I’m gonna be me!”, but I’m doing. A wee bit late, but that’s okay. I have been disappointed with myself and the way I’ve been neglecting this blog. That disappointment stops today. I’m going back to my roots. 😉

      Reply
    • Jade

      I think you are a rockstar, Spencer, because you are so honest with your writing. It’s something I admire and look up to!  

      Reply
  8. Dtravelsround

    Pam, thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I needed to read this post because I have felt the same way. After I got back from my trip, I had the same doubts and insecurities. And then, everyone started doing the rankings and everything, and I got STRESSED about it. Seriously stressed. I worried about what I was doing wrong, why my blog wasn’t good enough, and all of that other crap. It’s only been recently I have begun to take the same attitude you have taken — it’s about the writing and what I love. If other people love it, that’s great. It thrills me. I found that happy place I lost and am so glad you did, too. I wish you would be in Thailand in September b/c that’s when I am going. Since we missed each other in Vegas, we definitely need to have a meet up soon. Please, keep doing what you are doing. And, when you start to hear that god-awful noise again (if you ever do), I’m here and we can vent and move on together. 🙂 xx

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Awww, thanks D! We can become noise cancelling sistas! haha

      I’m super excited about Thailand. I’ll be there Oct 18th. Will you still be there?

      Reply
      • Dtravelsround

        Nope. I am there from Sept. 3 – 16. 🙁 It’s a quickie versus a proper adventure. 

  9. spencerspellman

    Let me say something else. You actually don’t have to be traveling all the time to still write about it. Crazy I know. You actually don’t have to eat all the time to have a foodie blog either. Now I’m just being downright snarky, I know. And I’m not talking to you Pam, but just saying that generally. However, I think there can be the assumption that if you aren’t doing it all the time or if there’s a lull, then there’s some kind of disappointment or missing the mark. But what’s the mark? And who set it? There’s not one. Travel can be experienced absolutely anywhere in the world, even in your own neighborhood and it doesn’t have to be some grand adventure. Take what is considered two of the greatest travelers in history, Lewis and Clark. They traveled like a few states and it took them like 3 years. I mean seriously? Sometimes I wonder if some people keep such a rigorous travel schedule or do it long-term because they feel like if they stop traveling so much, they won’t be able to write about it. I can’t speak for them, but it’s something to think about.

    Ok I believe I’m done here.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      I am so glad you added this comment, Spencer. Unfortunately there are some bloggers out there who think they need to be doing stuff all the time in order to write (I was a victim of this train of thought), but you don’t.

      Reply
  10. Pam

    I’m super happy for you. SUPER happy for you. If it didn’t come off as a teeny bit condescending, I might stick my neck out and say I’m proud of you, even. Noise is hard, it’s really hard, there’s all this “you oughta you oughta you oughta” but no mapping that to what it is you want or what the muse wants. So right on for you, RIGHT ON, and I’m looking forward to seeing what you do next.  

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thank-you Pam. Don’t worry, you didn’t come across as condescending at all. I’m truly grateful for having your ear when I was in Seattle last time. You definitely helped me to get the ball rolling. 🙂

      Reply
  11. Candice Walsh

     Pam, you’re rockin’ it. Good decision, IMHO. Sometimes those boundaries between blogging for fun and blogging for business get incredibly blurred…I’m glad you found some clarity. 

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Me too! I was starting to get seriously depressed about things. It’s nice to crawl out of that pit and see the sunshine again, although I’m not all the way out yet.

      Reply
  12. SpunkyGirl Monologues

    Thank-you so much, Sasha!

    I really felt the distance on Twitter if I wasn’t on there commenting, retweeting or commenting on blogs. It felt as though I didn’t really exist anymore and that made me a little bitter. As I look back, I realize that some of the blame for that lies with me. Now I can work towards changing that and becoming what I once was, a person who loved blogging and travel.

    Reply
  13. Howlin' Hobbit

    I think canceling out the noise is good in all sorts of ventures, not just blogging endeavors. I fall victim to the whole noise thing all over the place.

    Great post! Enjoy your travels.

    Reply
  14. Jade

    Just to echo everyone else, I too can totally relate. In fact, a few weeks ago, Bob said to me- “Is this fun for you anymore?” and I shrugged! I was way too worried about climbing this invisible ladder (the same thing I hated about corporate jobs). I know that when I write from a happy place, more people seem to enjoy it. So… I’ll join you- insert my noise cancellation headphones now!

    Reply
  15. SpunkyGirl Monologues

    Noise is like an industrial vacuum. It’s so hard to resist. I think being true to oneself is something that is rare right now and it shouldn’t be.
    Thank-you for stopping by to read and comment. 🙂

    Reply
  16. Anonymous

    Thanks for writing this Pam.  Noise–that’s a good way of putting it.  I’m dealing with my own noise at the moment as well.

    I can really relate right now to the feeling “my job became my life  and my life became my job.”  While my job is important to be for more reasons than I can get into here it’s also one more thing that is holding me back.  I’m looking forward to going somewhere new and having some fresh experiences to write about in the next few months but I am also feeling horribly guilty about taking time off.  

    I’m working overtime instead of writing blog posts, and I’ve barely made a tweet.  Even Facebook my old friend has sensed my absence.  I’ve missed out on a fabulous seat sale because I was too chicken to bring up the subject of time off.  And yet the guilt persists.

    I think I need to put on the headphones myself and spend a little time deciding what I need instead.  I’m looking forward to finding some balance again.  I look forward to reading about your upcoming travels this fall.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      OMG I am totally the same. I feel SO guilty when I ask for time off or make the choice to quit a job. I’ve even cried because I felt so guilty. Now I’m wondering why the hell I allow myself to feel guilty. The job wasn’t THAT good. My pay wasn’t THAT amazing.
      Keep your head up and remember to make yourself the priority. That’s what I’m working on.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        Thanks Pam.  My guilt is somewhat tangled up in the fact that I am working with a good friend who I want to see succeed too.  I’ve finally asked for the time off and although it won’t be as much as I would like it to be it’s a start.  Now to get back to my poor neglected blog…

  17. Oneika the Traveller

    This post is so timely!! I JUST wrote a post about how I’m just not really cut out to be a “pro travel blogger”.  The reason I started my blog in the first place was to keep in touch with family and friends, and through it all I became connected to a group of really cool like-minded people who love to travel as well.  I write now to communicate with this group… Generate discussion and the like.  For a bit, I was caught up with numbers and such, but there are so many amazing travel blogs out there, and sooooooo many people who put way more time and effort into it than I do that I will never be a “rockstar blogger”- so I’m not going to stress myself out and try!! I love to share, love to read other blogs, and at the end of the day, I’m doing this for the fun of it- I already have a full-time job and my blog should be a way for me to relax and unwind and have a good time ranting and sharing!

    Good on you for realizing that you need to “duck out” and get back to your roots!!

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thanks Onekia!

      I really do love to blog about travel, but I’ve been lost in all the numbers hoopla to remember it lately. I by no means consider myself a pro blogger, but I don’t want that to keep me from doing what I enjoy.

      I think being “rockstar blogger” is all relative. If you can connect with your readers and be yourself, then you are in fact, a rockstar blogger. There are a lot of blogs out there that feel empty and more manufactured than personal. Mine has definitely been that way for a couple months. However, I’m changing that.
      Flip off the numbers if they frustrate you and go back to having fun.

      Reply
  18. Mike Sowden

    I like your rant. 🙂

    And agree. Being plugged into it all too deeply means it affects you too deeply. And there’s so much contradictory advice being shouted out there, so it’s a guarantee of frustration if you try to discover the “best” way to travel-blog. Also? Frankly, there’s always going to be someone who is travelling or writing “better”, and getting too enmeshed in the ridiculous game that is Alexa and Twitter followers and I’ve Been 4,950 Days On The Road Without A Square Meal, HOOYAH, and all of that…well, that’s the way to feel unspecial, and un-You.Last year I really struggled with this kind of pressure. I’ve had a blog with “travel” plastered all over it for over a year now, and I’ve hardly travelled. (That’s in the process of changing, both locally and internationally). And I’ve felt that pressure. “They’re travelling right now and I’m not. How can I possibly put the #lp hashtag against my post? What a FRAUD”. etc etc. And this led me to write a post about how I’m not really a travel-blogger (fuelled by shame)… Rolf Potts just published a Paul Theroux rant on The Atlantic in which grumpy ole’ Theroux disses blogging. Mainly it’s him being Grandpa Simpson (as Pam Mandel put it), but also, he said “blogging seems too hasty”. That’s a really interesting thing. The suggestion that we get so obsessed with turnover and with metrics and eyeballs that we push things out the door while they’re essentially in draft form. I like that. It explains many things. The really good, carefully written, well-edited, succinct and meaning-packed stuff in travel-blogging is the stuff that endures. The same way good books endure.
    When we block out the noise and take the time and dig deep and focus, we craft. Travel-blogging needs more of that.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Nail on head. Yep. Totally nailed it with your comment, Mike.

      I think when we concentrate too hard on the “best” way to write, we forget to write! I don’t want my brain to hurt when I’m writing. I want to be excited about it, put my personality into it and find a way to share my story with my readers. I want the connection (similar to what this post has generated).

      Reply
      • Mike Sowden

        Agreed. 🙂

        Of course, here we are ourselves talking about travel-blogging. 😉 But – yes. As important as it is for this budding industry (because that’s what travel-blogging is, according to any metrics you might choose) to be self-reflective, and as important as the business side of it is and the technical side…hell, I just want to be a better writer. That’s what my blog is for. To make me write better. That’s why I started it, that’s why I’ve continued with it even though it takes up time I could use earning money. It pushes me and it showcases what I can do, and I’ll confess I’m now using it strategically, writing things designed to get the attention of people I want to work for. ;) 

        That’s the point of my blog right now. The rest is a luxury, if I have any time left over from trying to earn the cash to travel. :)     

        Frankly, travel-blogging is a game with a twisted logic. Too often we’re trying to stand out from the crowd by doing the same things as each other, except more often. That’s kinda crazy. That’s a doomed way to do. And frankly, it’s a guaranteed way to turn blogging into just a job like any other, where you’re doing things you don’t enjoy purely for money or, in the case of most blogging, “career advancement”. So, stuff that approach.

        We need to stop, take a deep breath and say “why?”. We need to do that regularly. Block the noise out, look in a mirror and say “Come on, what’s your point here? Spit it out”.

      • SpunkyGirl Monologues

        Haha nail on head. Again.

        Thanks, Mike. There is definitely a lot to think about here. Very good, solid advice.

    • Jenna

      Interesting point about blogging being too hasty. You’re right– so much of it is pushed out while still in draft form. I often spend days going over my posts and edit carefully but get many fewer posts published than others. That’s just how I am, and I won’t change that to get more posts published. We should all aim to dig deep and craft, as you said.

      Reply
    • Jenna

      Interesting point about blogging being too hasty. You’re right– so much of it is pushed out while still in draft form. I often spend days going over my posts and edit carefully but get many fewer posts published than others. That’s just how I am, and I won’t change that to get more posts published. We should all aim to dig deep and craft, as you said.

      Reply
  19. SpunkyGirl Monologues

    Thank-you for your comment, Jenna. Yesterday morning when I wrote this post I felt as though I was totally alone and therefore a failure as a blogger. I now know differently. I’m not anywhere close to being alone!
    When I was laying in bed last night I started to chuckle as I remembered something my Mom (and I’m sure everyone’s Mom) use to say to me when I was a teenager. “If all your friends jump off a bridge, are you going to jump too?”. Never, in a million years, would I have related that statement to blogging -until today. LOL
    As for your website…If you like the way it is now, then don’t change it. If you start giving up the things YOU enjoy for things you THINK everyone else will enjoy, “YOU” may get lost in the shuffle. 😉

    Reply
    • Jenna

       No, you’re definitely NOT alone, and it’s only natural that after a while we, as emotional human beings, resist the competition that is out there. I too chuckled while reading your comment above about what our moms said to us as teenagers– I sometimes feel that way about blogging, like, “Wow, I’m 37 years old and feeling the pressure to “fit in”?!” At least we all can support each other in letting everyone be who they want to be.  Writing from the heart is always so much more powerful than writing for rankings, etc.

      Reply
  20. Gillian Duffy

    I think it’s good to look inward and remember why it was you started on this path but don’t be thinking that things on your blog were not successful. Isn’t that what this is all about…continuous improvement? Some stuff works for you and other stuff doesn’t. It’s good not to get caught up in the hype but don’t stop trying new things in your writing or curating of SpunkyGirl!!

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      I understand what you’re saying, and it does make sense. However, I think that trying to be more than what I can handle at the time is what get me (and many ppl) into trouble. For me it needs to feel natural. I don’t do well when it feels forced.

      Reply
  21. Gray

    Love this post, Pam. I recently went through this myself. It took me 3 years to figure this out, so I guess I’m a slow learner. :-)  But after the soul-searching I’ve done recently, and reading your post and the comments here, I have concluded that in an irony of ironies, the travel blogging community, after so much railing against “the rat race” of the traditional work-life model of climbing the corporate ladder, has essentially recreated that ladder paradigm for itself within our own community. Hence the travel blogger arms race to out-SEO each other and climb to the top of every “top blogger” rankings list….mostly fed by our own insecurities as we compare ourselves to others and a desperate desire to make a living at this. We often forget there’s a whole other world of travelers out there who really don’t care about that stuff and who don’t care if we’re traveling nonstop; they just want to read about travel, and for whatever reason, they’ve decided they like our voices and like what we write about. So I’ll tell you what some of my readers have been telling me: Just keep the content coming at a pace that works for you, and we’ll keep reading. All the rest is extraneous BS.

    Reply
  22. Sheri

     Thanks for your honesty and courage in writing this, Pam. I blog infrequently in large part due to my fears about not doing it “right” (whatever that means)…it feels safer not to do it at all, but I really want to write about my travels. I just bought a ticket to TBEX since it’s just up the road from me so am hoping to be inspired and not intimidated! Sorry to hear you won’t be there, was looking forward to finally meeting you, but I’m sure you’ll get back down to Seattle one of these days soon, and we can go have a Meander’s Scramble together!  

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      If you want to write about your travels, do it! I’d love to read about them. 🙂

      We will definitely go to Meander’s. I’m now craving the scramble. Haha

      Reply
  23. Heather

    Kudos for listening to that inner voice — for taking a break, taking care of yourself, and continuing to blog in the way you need. I agree with Sally — different folks seek different things from writing about experiences (travel related or otherwise) — and its easy to see what everyone else is doing and do the same or wonder if we should. I’ve asked myself lots of questions about my blog over the last year and have had to remind myself several times what I want and what I don’t.

    Thanks for sharing this post!

    Reply
  24. Adventurous Kate

    Pam, I love hearing your voice, especially when it shines through on posts like this!

    In return for your honest post, here’s an honest comment: I rarely read guest posts.  19 times out of 20, I skip them, though I do read the occasional one that sounds interesting.  I follow blogs, yours included, because I follow bloggers.  I love reading about your lives and what you’re up to now.

    So I’m glad to see you returning to the writing that makes you happy!  When your voice shines through, you’ll attract readers who like you for who you are…and there isn’t anything better than that, is there?

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      Thanks for the comment Kate!

      I like to think of the last few months as “Limbo”. I’ve made the choice to stop guest posts etc as of June 1st and go back to just myself. I think, for me, it’s the best choice.

      Reply
  25. Dmcstjohn

    So you decided to unplug from all the distractions, that doesn’t sound selfish at all. It sounds like you know what you need to feel & work your best. I routinely turn off all phones, alerts, everything, when I need to recharge my batteries & refocus. We have lost a lot of the meditation time – time alone – that helped our ancestors stay level headed & emotionally healthy.

    Reply
    • SpunkyGirl Monologues

      I think becoming unplugged is important, but not too much. For myself, if I unplug for too long, I withdraw and things start to suffer. Example… the last four/five months!! haha

      I’m back now though. 😉

      Reply
  26. My Crazy TBEX Plan

    […] having the energy and not knowing what to do.After weeks of feeling this way, I made the choice to put on some noise cancelling headphones, and re-focus. I’d go back to square one. Just be me again. The idea of going to a conference […]

    Reply
  27. yTravelBlog

    Hi Pam,
    I just found this post on SU. so great that you are discovering what is important to you and cancelling out the noise. I think everyone gets overwhelmed and deafened by the noise whatever it is we decide to do. 
    They key is to learn to cancel it out-by doing what you love, not comparing yourself to others, and then of course the equally important, not judge others for what they do, as that just creates more noise. 
    I think if everyone got a handle on those three things the world would be real pretty!

    Reply
    • Pamela

      You’re totally right. Positivity is so much better. Thankfully I’ve learned to kind of ignore the hype on social media and do my own thing. It can be a challenge at times, but in the end it’s best to focus on what I’m passionate about!

      Reply
  28. It's a Travelversary Kind of Month - Spunkygirl Monologues

    […] caught up by all the ‘noise’ in the travel blogging world and felt the need for ‘Putting on Noise-Cancelling Headphones‘.I accepted a trip in Africa with Intrepid Tavel and traveled overland on their Kenya to Cape […]

    Reply
  29. Penny

    I know exactly what you are talking about and my blog is only about 5 months old! But at least I’m aware. After reading this I know I have to put the headphones on a leave them on! I

    Reply
  30. The 7 Links Project, Spunky Style - Spunkygirl Monologues

    […] of all the noise and decided to vent out my feelings via this blog. I wrote a post called ‘Putting on Noise Cancelling Headphones’, clicked publish, shutdown my laptop and went about my day. The response I received from that post […]

    Reply

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